104 Relinquishing

We want what we want when we want it, and we want others to be happy when we get it. We may pray earnestly God gives us what we want and feel disappointed when we do not receive it in our time frame. We might get insistent and demanding with God. In these times we need to relinquish control to God.

He withdrew about a stone’s throw beyond them, knelt down and prayed, “Father, if You are willing, take this cup from Me; yet, not my will, but Yours be done.” Luke 22:41

Relinquishing prayer does not mean we let go of all our desires. Rather, we pray for what we want in an attitude of humility, not demanding God to grant our request, but asking for our heart’s desire and leaving the answer to God.

Today I read about Dorrie, a Filipino young woman who exemplified relinquishing prayer. She took a ride on the ship Christopher. A furious storm sank the ship which had no life-boats and far too few life-vests. Dorrie swam poorly and had no life-vest. She clung to a piece of floating wood from the ship. After sinking and returning to the surface three times, she saw a large fire extinguisher floating at her. She held it in one hand and the wood in the other. The storm and waves had separated her from others. She sung to the Lord as night approached and prayed. She saw two bras and had a sudden insight to use them to tie together the wood and extinguisher. She then leaned upon them. By early morning she was exhausted and dehydrated. When a sudden rain fell, she said, “Thank you, Jesus!” and drank it. After another three hours she was so weak that she prayed, “Lord, I’m ready to die in the sea to be with You, but I’m also ready to live to serve You. You choose, Lord; Your will be done.” Two carrots floated to her. She received a bit of strength from eating them. Half an hour later, seventeen hours after the ship sank, she was rescued.*

Relinquishing prayer involves opening our hands rather than grasping for what we want. We hold loosely the things we want and allow God to work in our hearts as well as our circumstances. We present our requests to God not knowing how He will answer. While waiting, we thank Him for His goodness to us and find “the peace that surpasses understanding.” (Philippians 4:7)

Receiving His peace,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching Hospitality Mercy Encouragement.

Living for the glory of God by grace received through faith in the Messiah, the Word of God made flesh.  We have a dream & request support and prayers.

Outline:  http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com

 

*Robert Doorn, The Filipinos Are Coming! pp. 39-41


103 Asking

Shame says not to ask for what we want. Humility gives us permission to ask. We are not acting in humility when we do not ask God for what we want. We need to ask God before asking anyone else in order to keep God first in our lives. We need to remember that He is the source of all good things. “Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, Who does not change like shifting shadows.” James 1:17

“You may ask Me for anything in My Name, and I will do it.” John 14:14

We try to prove ourselves by making our own way in this world. We need to acknowledge our dependence on God. In owning our need for Him, we let go of our perfectionism. Pretending that we can do it all on our own involves denial. When we try on our own to figure out all the solutions to our problems, we weary our souls.

God knows more than we ever could about every minute detail of our lives. He commands us to trust Him and give Him first place in our lives. “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding.” (Proverbs 3:5)

We think we are bothering God when we ask Him for too many things. We think we are humble when we don’t ask for help for some things, but in not asking, we put ourselves back on our own resources and strength. We humble ourselves when we trust Him.

Striving to ask,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching/shepherding Hospitality Mercy Encouragement

Bringing grace and truth to the downcast; comforting others with the comfort, which we received.

We have a dream & need support and prayers.

Outline: http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com


102 Humility Not Shame

I last blogged in June of 2014. I have been working through a lot of things, especially moving out of our apartment last year. I finally decided to take a year off in keeping with Exodus 23:10-11, “For six years you are to sow your fields and harvest the crops, but during the seventh year let the land lie unplowed and unused.” Some people call this the Shemitah year. That occurred from September 2014 to September 2015. Lately, I have been taking care of Marguex, and we are working through buying a house, so still very busy. I want to start blogging again and am taking the time to do this. Here is the first of what hopefully will be a long series of more blogs. Thanks for being patient.

When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom Proverbs 11:2

Last time I wrote about magic-bullet prayer. We cannot make God do our bidding. We simply lay our requests before Him and trust Him with the answers. We need to persist in prayer in humility, not demanding our way with God. Humility involves surrendering our will to God’s will.

Yet, we need to take care of ourselves. We need to provide for our needs and desires. We need to assert ourselves, right? Modern psychology certainly would back all these statements. However, I find the Bible to take a very different approach. According to the Bible, we need to humble ourselves before God, and He will provide for us.

To humble ourselves, we need to cast our cares upon God in trusting obedience. We humbly look to Him to provide for all of our needs and even to decide what it is we really need. We accept His will for our lives and lay aside our selfishness and selfish ambition.

To humble ourselves may seem like shame. We need to learn the difference. In humility we acknowledge our limitations before the Almighty God. In shame we say that we are less than others. Shame leads to pride, not humility. We can humble ourselves without rejecting ourselves. Rejecting ourselves exhibits pride because we claim to have some authority to decide whether or not we are acceptable. God has already accepted us in His own dear Son Whom He loves!

For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted. Luke 1:14

God wants us to humble ourselves so that He can exalt us. Humility is not about making ourselves nothing, but about receiving the gift of what God thinks about us. Shame and humility are not the same thing. We need ongoing revelation on this to discern the difference.

Looking for His ongoing revelation,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching/shepherding Hospitality Mercy Encouragement

Bringing grace and truth to the downcast; comforting others with the comfort, which we received.

We have a dream & need support and prayers.

Back to Outline: http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com


100 Receiving Prayer

Perfectionism afflicts us emotionally and mentally as a disease. Disease is dis-ease and uneasiness as well as dysfunctionality. Perfectionism wars against peace and rest. It allows no comfort nor any type of easing of pain. Perfectionism causes much of our pain.

Is any one of you sick? He should call the elders of the church to pray over him and anoint him with oil in the name of the Lord. James 5:14

Other people will pray for us if we ask. This becomes necessary for our healing and growth. Perfectionism itself blinds us to our own perfectionistic behaviors. In fact, those very behaviors and the rewards we reap from them reinforce our perfectionistic belief systems.

We cannot see what others plainly see. The nearness of our own problems prevents us from seeing them clearly, like trying to focus on one’s own nose. Others provide a mirror to see our reflection. Further, they pray for us in ways which we would not even think to pray.

Receiving prayer is humbling. Yea! (Throw your arms up in the air and shout!) We get to humble ourselves by asking for prayer. We make ourselves vulnerable when sharing such deep issues. Also, we ask for help in asking for prayer. We resist asking because we are proud. Is losing our pride such a bad thing? Let us let go of pride and ask for prayer.

Whom can we ask? Our churches or bible studies have people who can pray for us. Many churches have prayer teams during services and prayer ministries where an appointment for prayer can be made. The website or information line may say how to receive prayer. We can definitely ask friends, family or co-workers in our lives to pray.

Those safe people who pray for us do so in ways we do not think to pray. As an added benefit, they will agree with us in our own prayers for freedom from perfectionism. Our becoming free from perfectionism will benefit those around us.

Yes, asking for prayer is humbling. Remember, humbling ourselves helps to free us from pride, shame and perfectionism. Either we humble ourselves, or we will be humbled.

Blessed and calling for more,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching/shepherding Hospitality Mercy Encouragement

Bringing grace and truth to the downcast; comforting others with the comfort, which we received.

We have a dream & need support and prayers.

Back to Outline: http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com


98 Not an Option

Either we humble ourselves, or we will be humbled. Humbling ourselves is the better option.

For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted. Luke 18:14

Jesus called them together and said, “You know that those who are regarded as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all.” Mark 10:42-44

James and John requested to be next to Jesus in the Kingdom of God. The rest of the disciples reacted to James and John’s request in a typically human manner. In a like manner, we seek to be elevated over others. We also resent those over us. How peculiar, we resent those who succeed but if we were to succeed, we would think we deserved our success and others should be glad for us. We cling to this double standard. We wish ourselves fortune and others failure. We won’t complain when we get what is better. We only say, “That’s not fair!” when others get something better than we do.

How about this: The next time we get some special benefit, say, “It’s not fair that I received this special privilege that others didn’t receive!” Let’s try it now, “It’s not fair that I get to live in the first world while others are living in destitute poverty all around the world! It’s not fair that I am saved while others are going to hell. It’s not fair that I get to experience God’s love while others know nothing about it! I don’t deserve all the special privileges I am receiving!”

Complaining, “It’s not fair,” about receiving some benefit goes against our natural tendencies. Our flesh is naturally selfish. We want what we want when we want it, and we want others to be happy about it. “Me! Me! Me!” is the cry of our hearts. Telling ourselves to be humble is like teaching a cat to do tricks. We cannot make ourselves humble. Neither can others make us humble because that would be shaming.

“He who humbles himself…” How then do we humble ourselves? We definitely need God’s help in the process, and the great thing is we can ask for His help. This is in itself an act of humbling ourselves before Him. I hope to talk about prayer and God’s nature in upcoming posts.

Prayerfully Yours,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching/Shepherding Hospitality Mercy Encouragement

Bringing grace and truth to the downcast; comforting others with the comfort, which we have been comforted.

We have a dream & need support and prayers.

Back to Outline: http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com


97 Humility Summary

The secrets to humility change how we relate to others. These secrets are:  Weakness, Worship Listening Obedience, Confession, Learning not to Boast, Responsibility, Overlooking an Offense, Pain, Asking for Help, Receiving Gifts, Thankfulness, Receiving Compliments, Seeking to Understand, Advice, Yielding an Argument, Understanding Anger, Forgiving, Giving, Serving, Contentment, Waiting, Joy, Kindness, Fasting, Rest, The Right Fear, Salvation and Clothed.

Does the above list seem impossible to accomplish? Good, because it is. We cannot humble ourselves with our own power. Owning our inability to make ourselves humble actually moves us closer to true humility. Realizing our limitations, we cry out to God for help, placing ourselves under His mighty hand.

His divine power has given us everything we need for life and godliness through our knowledge of Him Who called us by His Own glory and goodness. II Peter 1:3

The humility list could continue indefinitely. Any circumstance beyond our ability teaches us humility. When bad things happen, let us rejoice! Yes, rejoice in the bad things that happen to us. God uses them to develop humility in our character. (James 1:2-4) We need humility to receive the good things God has for us as gifts. Faith, hope and love (I Corinthians 13:13) also become a part of our character. These four traits work together.

A secret for losing humility is to talk about how good we are at it. (Luke 18:12) Even if we are not boasting about how humble we have made ourselves, talking about humbling ourselves can open our hearts to seeking praise from men rather than praise from God. In reminding one another of the need to humble ourselves we need to be sensible of the temptation toward claiming credit.

We resist humbling ourselves. Humbling ourselves can be agonizing because we become aware of the shame as well as the other feelings and memories that go with it. Pride masks our shame. Letting go of pride makes us vulnerable. Allowing ourselves to look at all of this is a step in the process of finding freedom from pride, shame and perfectionism. We allow ourselves to heal when we let go of denying our shame. We can respond to shame either with humility or with pride. Shame is masked by pride. We are not freed from shame by pride. God liberates us with humility. We are freed from shame as we humble ourselves under His mighty hand. (1 Peter 5:6)

Realizing I have lots to let go of,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching/Shepherding Hospitality Mercy Encouragement

Bringing grace and truth to the downcast; comforting others with the comfort, which we have been comforted.

We have a dream & need support and prayers.

Blog Outline at: http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com


96 Clothed

The twenty eighth secret to humility is being clothed with the Lord Jesus Christ.

Rather, clothe yourselves with the Lord Jesus Christ, and do not think about how to gratify the desires of the sinful nature. Roman 13:14

When we accept salvation as God’s gift, we receive Jesus into our hearts. Jesus still sits on His throne in Heaven, but He also lives in us by His Spirit. This is a great mystery of the Trinity. God gives us Jesus because God’s nature is to give. He wants Jesus to live in us! We may resist Jesus, but Jesus does not withhold Himself from us.

Jesus lives in us. We also live in Him. He holds us like clothing does. In clothing ourselves in Jesus, we choose Him over ourselves. We let go of the desires of the sinful nature and instead desire Jesus. We humbly acknowledge that what Jesus gives us is much better than what we could want apart from Him.

When we clothe ourselves with Jesus, we rankle (wrinkle) our sin natures. Our sin natures resist Jesus and his work in our lives. We need to choose Jesus over sin. When we choose Jesus, we clothe ourselves in Him.

In being clothed in Jesus, we take on His nature. We allow ourselves to be transformed into His likeness. “Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—His good, pleasing and perfect will.” (Romans 12:2)

“Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ.” (I Corinthians 11:1) Being transformed into Christ’s image is a process. We imitate Christ. We often fail as we seek to imitate Him. We are far from perfect. When we choose to follow Jesus’ example, we get some idea of how far away from that example we are. Realizing this is humbling.

We humble ourselves as we find how much we are not like Christ and then choose to continue to seek and follow Him. In this life we will never get to the point that we can say that we are just like Him, but we still make our aim to be like Him. Being transformed into the likeness of Jesus is a process. We need to humble ourselves before Him and ask Him to transform us more and more into His image.

Being clothed,

Noah Woodrich

WITH ME: Wisdom Intercession Teaching/Shepherding Hospitality Mercy Encouragement

Bringing grace and truth to the downcast; comforting others with the comfort, which we received. We have a dream & need support and prayers.

Back to Outline: http://www.livingwithperfectionism.wordpress.com